Finding an Internship

Internships are great opportunities to build your resume, network, and experience the field.
You can find internships in a few different ways:

Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology

Lloyd W. Swift Fund to support Experiential Learning

See below for more information

Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology

Read their internship webpage and make direct contact to the museum

WFCB faculty and grad students

Scroll down to Summer Research Opportunities

Review your WFCB listserv

Check your inbox regularly for internship opportunities from WFCB advising

Campus

The Internship and Career Center (ICC)

Offers assistance in finding internships. Visit the ICC's website for more information.

The Undergraduate Research Center (URC)

Offers guidance and advising in obtaining research opportunities. See URC's website for more information.

Department of Animal Science

Check out their internship webpage

UC Davis Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Ecology and the Environmental Sciences

A continuously updated list of undergraduate research opportunities related to ecology and the environmental sciences. Visit this page to learn more

The Lloyd W. Swift Endowment Fund (rolling admission)

  • The Lloyd W. Swift Endowment focuses on supporting experiential learning opportunities.  These can include any experiential learning activity, such as a research experience, a non-WFCB field course (see below), or an externship experience (termed “externship” because such experiences are normally off-campus), that advances the student’s career goals.
  • These opportunities can occur during summer, or during the academic year.  Applications should demonstrate that the financial impact of the award will be instrumental in facilitating the experiential learning, and not merely supplementing or replacing existing funds.
  • To help you find an externship we have created a list of suggested partners (see pdf). These suggestions are based on input from the WFCB faculty. Please let our Experiential Learning coordinator Pernille Sporon Boving (boving@ucdavis.edu) know if you have any particular interest in any of the suggested partners and we may be able to direct you better.
  • Students receiving Swift awards must be WFCB majors, and the award will go only to the student.
  • Your application will be read and evaluated by the WFCB Endowment Committee.
  • How to Apply: Complete this google form and hit the submit button once you have filled all the required entries.

Lloyd W. Swift Summer Research Award (annual call)

  • We are accepting summer research 2023 applications. Apply by Wednesday February 15th 2023. Follow the instructions below and when ready apply using this google form.

  • The Lloyd Swift Endowment supports summer experiential learning opportunities for WFCB majors, and these opportunities can include externships or participation in research projects.  The student must be a WFCB undergraduate for >50% of the duration of the experience.  The project supervisor can be a graduate student, postdoc, research staff, or faculty; preference will be given to supervisors affiliated with WFCB.  Interested students are encouraged to contact their proposed supervisor to collaboratively develop their Swift application and a letter of endorsement from the supervisor. 
  • Applications should demonstrate that the financial impact of the award will be instrumental in facilitating the learning experience, and not merely replacing existing funds for the same experience.  The application should be brief; aside from the basic contact information, it should indicate:

·The nature and timing of the experiential learning opportunity
· How that opportunity will advance the student’s educational or career goals
· The amount of money needed to enable the opportunity, with a budget and   justification; salary equivalent to half-time, UC scale, is allowable but must be justified in terms of enabling the experience.

  • A letter of support from the supervisor should endorse the application, establish that other funds to support the student for the experience are not available, and agree to ensure that a thank you letter is submitted.  Funds must be expended within 60 days of the conclusion of the experience.   The supervisor is responsible for ensuring that the proposal includes all components, presented clearly and succinctly.  Submissions will be limited to a total of five per PI or lab.
  • At the conclusion of the summer experience, the awardee, in collaboration with the supervisor, will briefly explain how Swift funds were spent and will write a letter to the Swift family.  The letter should summarize the experience and its importance, and thank the family for making that experience possible. 
  • Here you may also find Summer Research Opportunities.

Credit For Internships:

Students can receive credit for internships via units and/or transcript notation.
92/192: Variable unit internship. Ask the faculty member if you can register for 92/192 units, and then contact the department staff adviser to obtain a Course Registration Number (CRN). The number on units your register for depends on the number of hours you work.  Use ICC guidlines to determine this number. You will need to register for your internship by the 12th day of the quarter. After this time, you will need to be issued a PTA by the department’s staff adviser. Transcript notation can be obtained through the ICC with cooperation from your employer. See the ICC's instructions for more
information.

Non-WFCB Field Courses:
 

intern1.jpgCalifornia Ecology and Conservation brings together 27 students from across the UC system for seven weeks of intensive learning at NRS reserves. Guided by experienced field instructors, undergraduates transform into scientists by conducting independent research studies. Students learn to notice natural patterns, frame questions into feasible research projects, and practice standard techniques such as surveys of animal and plant populations. At the conclusion of each project, students analyze their data and present their findings to the class in oral presentations, posters, and reports. Students hone their research, public speaking, and scientific writing skills with constant practice and feedback. All the while, students gain a working familiarity with California’s diverse ecosystems while immersed in the NRS’s classrooms without walls. Photo credit: May Roberts.
 

intern3.jpgThe Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program at UCSC exposes early-career college students to the field of environmental conservation through field research, leadership and professional training.
Each year, we select 20 students from around the U.S. and its territories to participate in our two-year conservation leadership program. Our students represent a diverse spectrum of cultures and backgrounds, which helps to cultivate an inclusive and rewarding experience. Photo credit: The Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program.

External Internships:

Marcella Kelly Jaguar.pngWild cat study in Belize
Please note this experience is volunteer and requires a      project fee (see below), which covers room, board, and in-country transport. Additionally, participants must provide own transportation to Belize. We have worked with numerous students to find grant funding and to obtain university credit.

We are seeking 5-10 motivated field assistants for our wild cat study in Belize, Central America. This study focuses on jaguars, pumas, and ocelots using non-invasive detection methods and researches the long-term demographics of jaguar populations and the impacts of selective/sustainable logging at multiple sites across Belize.

Volunteers will gain extensive field experience setting up large remote camera grids across tropical broadleaf and/or tropical pine forests, conducting habitat surveys in neotropical forest, orienteering with GPS and map and compass, field vehicle maintenance, organizing and entering data, and maintaining a database.

Job includes driving and hiking trails on dirt roads and trails to remote camera stations and collecting vegetation data surrounding camera stations. Field assistants may be required to carry heavy equipment, and may hike long distances through rough (but relatively flat) terrain, and bushwhack through thick vegetation. Work will also include shared data entry and camp and vehicle maintenance and running errands and other household chores.

Rustic living conditions in a tropical environment (meaning very hot and humid weather, snakes, and biting insects). Field assistants will be living in close living quarters with their co-workers and will be expected to help out with group cooking, cleaning, and other basic field-house chores.

Qualifications: Preference given to students in wildlife biology or related field (biology, forestry, natural resources, etc.). No experience is necessary, but the applicant must have a positive and flexible attitude, be enthusiastic and ready to learn, have a strong work ethic and ability to get along with others in tight, close-knit, living conditions. 

Ability to drive a standard (manual) transmission and backpacking skills are not required but are a plus. 

This is a volunteer position, meaning that technician will need to pay for their plane ticket and a project fee of $1750 per month (1-month minimum required). This project fee covers food, accommodations, and all in-country transport while in Belize (except for days off and vacation days). The experience is a resume builder for wild cat work. It is much less expensive than a typical study abroad experience. A large number of past students have received funding and/or independent study credit from their host institution to participate. 

Summer positions available from ~May 07, 2022 through August 30, 2022
Winter positions available from ~December 15, 2022 to March 15, 2023

Please e-mail a resume/cv, letter of interest, and list of three references with contact info to Darby McPhail (dkm5ek@vt.edu) and David Lugo (dal0826@vt.edu) and cc Marcella Kelly at makelly2@vt.edu.  Dr. Kelly is a WFCB alumni.

Application Deadline: Rolling, will be filled continuously. 

Should you successfully land an internship with the Wild Cat project you become eligible to apply for a Lloyd W. Swift endowment to support project fee and airfare.  If you have any questions please reach out to Experiential Learning Coordinator Pernille Sporon Bøving; boving@ucdavis.edu.

Internship Location- Auburn, CA Start-End Date- Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and admitted based on preset orientation dates. However, the best time to intern with us is during our busy baby season. Anytime from March through October we.jpgWildlife Intake Center (WIC) Internship. The Wildlife Intake Center (WIC) Internship provides hands-on experience in the Gold Country Wildlife Rescue (GCWR) clinic working with injured and orphaned wildlife. Interns learn basic animal caretaking procedures, medical protocols, and in-depth species identification and natural histories.

Interns will work alongside staff and other volunteers/interns to complete all tasks associated with animal rehabilitation. Interns will primarily work in the WIC helping with cage cleaning, animal feeding, medication distribution and other daily tasks. Some duties, however, may include animal pick-ups from vets, or special projects as needs arise.

Gold Country Wildlife Rescue is a non-profit organization, dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, and release of injured and orphaned wildlife. We are permitted through the California Department of Fish & Wildlife, and the US Fish & Wildlife Service. We have been serving the local community since 1991 and do so at no charge.

Internship Location: 11251 B Ave., Auburn, CA 95603. Start/End Date: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and admitted based on preset orientation dates. However, the best time to intern with us is during our busy baby season. Anytime from March through October we received our largest amount of animal intakes. During these months interns get to see and work with the largest variety of species.

Orientations are typically held February, April, June, and August. Additional orientations are held as needed. Dates can be flexible depending on intern availability and seasonal needs.

If interested in a specific timeframe, please contact volunteers@goldcountrywildliferescue.org for additional information.

Minimum Age Requirement: 18+ years. Minimum Time Commitment: At least 16 hours per week, for a minimum total of 200+ hours over the course of the internship session. Housing/Transportation: No housing or transportation is provided to interns by GCWR. All housing and transportation arrangements are the responsibility of the intern. Salary: This an unpaid internship, but should you successfully land an internship with GCWR you become eligible to apply for a Lloyd W. Swift endowment as a WFCB major.

For more information and to apply visit: goldcountrywildliferescue.org/internships/

pointblue.jpgConservation Science Bird Banding Internships at the Palomarin Field Station. Location: Bolinas, CA. Duration: approximately July 1st to mid-September, 2022 about 10 weeks. Approximate hours: 40 hours/week. Housing: Provided at the Palomarin Field Station (communal living, shared bedrooms). Number of Positions: 2.  Application window has closed.

Since 1966, we have been training the next generation of conservation scientists through intensive field- based internships at the Palomarin Field Station. These immersive internships teach landbird research techniques and data-driven solutions to conservation challenges. Interns completing our program leave with a comprehensive knowledge base, including the ability to design and implement conservation research, communicate research to the public, and ensure data are incorporated effectively into data management systems and resource management planning efforts.

Interns will learn key concepts and skills in the following six areas: 1) Field methods in ecological and conservation research with a focus on mist netting and bird banding of songbirds (this will be the primary activity), 2) understanding the scientific process and the role of natural history observation in guiding meaningful research and conservation, 3) critical thinking and evaluation of research and conservation, 4) climate-smart conservation, 5) best practices in science interpretation, and 6) skills and advances in data management and data integrity.

Qualifications: Desired applicants will have a strong interest in birds and conservation, and the desire to spend long hours in the field and office. A typical field day starts before sunrise and involves hiking 5-7 miles; the terrain has some incline, and can be uneven. Participants must be able to work independently as well as in groups. Exposure to some poison oak is unavoidable. Point Blue is committed to increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion at our organization, and individuals from all backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, crew members will be expected to follow CDC, state of California, County of Marin, and Point Blue guidelines to protect themselves and members of their crew and community; the nature of some of the field work and the group living environment often precludes masking or social distancing, so vaccination is necessary

pointblue.jpgStudents and Teachers Restoring A Watershed Assistant Educator. Duration: Approximately mid-June to mid-September (flexible start and end date)
Approximate Hours: max 20 hours per week. Location and Travel Commitment: A significant part of this role will be online, remote work; occasional travel to headquarters. Housing - For required traveling, mileage reimbursements & housing will be provided for the night before & after to Point Blue Stallcup Residential House in Petaluma, CA. Number of positions: 1 

Application window has closed.

Point Blue’s Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed (STRAW) Program has collaborated with San Francisco Bay Area K-12th grade students to implement restoration projects for nearly 30 years and we hope you join our team! Throughout the summer, we provide Bay Area community college students that identify as Black, Indigenous, and people of color with a hybrid (online, in-person) internship that explores conservation careers, restoration science practices, and environmental justice issues.

Interns will gain 1) an understanding of and experience in community-based restoration science & environmental justice education 2) experience coordinating hybrid (online/in-person) summer internship programs 3) greater understanding of personal and professional strengths and interests and how to implement future endeavors.

Core Responsibilities: Support community college student learning by providing enhanced technological and logistical support, as well as creativity at events including online Seminar & Community Day Facilitation, speaker, and mentor schedule. As a STRAW team shared responsibility, we will all (1) demonstrate a commitment to diversity, equity, inclusivity, and the local community; & (2) adhere to public safety guidelines for the ongoing COVID pandemic.

Qualifications:  Strong Interest in environmental education and teaching | Motivated to learn new skills and concepts (i.e. independent research for lesson, technology troubleshooting) |Approaches logistical planning with curiosity | Familiarity with Microsoft Office & Google Suite

pointblue.jpgSummer Unmanned Aearial Vehicle (UAV) Internship. Location: Mostly home office with some fieldwork UAV surveys possible. Duration: June 15 to September 15, 2022. Approximate hours per week: 20 (hours flexible, can be more if desired). Number of positions: 1

Application window has closed.

Generating timely estimates of the abundance of wild species remains a persistent challenge. The use of un-crewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) for conducting ecological surveys has the potential to improve the efficiency and accuracy of many wildlife surveys. We have a couple projects underway designed to estimate the breeding populations of seabirds, (California Gulls at Mono Lake, California and Adélie penguins in Antarctica) using UAV surveys. We are looking for a student to help with processing imagery collected during these surveys. Image processing tasks may include stitching images to create a single mosaicked image, tagging images

(marking/identifying individual birds in image tiles) for training an automated counting algorithm, classifying imagery to identify vegetation types, and/or manually counting objects for model verification and comparison, and developing workflows and documentation. The student may also assist with preparing data and conducting preliminary analysis. Some fieldwork conducting UAV surveys to collect additional imagery in California is anticipated and the student would have the opportunity to assist by traveling to field sites and assisting with UAV operations during the surveys. Fieldwork may require camping for up to several nights at a time. Student will gain skills and experience with many applied aspects of conducting UAV surveys for monitoring wildlife populations. A laptop and all required software will be provided for the duration of the position.

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Cramer Fish Sciences (CFS) is accepting applications for Internships based out of their West Sacramento office.  Spring Quarter Internship Opportunity. Application window has closed.

As a CFS Intern you will receive hands-on experience in a range of laboratory, office and field settings and see how applied science can support environmental management. Specifically, you will be responsible for Chinook Salmon eye lens extraction and dissection under a biologist’s supervision for use in isotope analysis. This novel technique allows researchers to study how water operations impact juvenile salmon outmigration strategies and how those different outmigration strategies influence the survival of returning adult spawners. The internship is lab focused, with possible field work opportunities on various CFS studies. A minimum of one full 8-hour day or two 4-hour days per week is required.

Essential duties and responsibilities:
1. Safely conduct supervised field and lab work for a wide array of projects.
2. Careful lab work performance with diligence for organization and attention to detail
3. Perform hands-on work in a field setting which may include fish trapping and tagging, visual   estimation techniques (e.g., snorkeling, redd surveys), collecting physical environmental data (e.g., water quality, channel bathymetry), and attention to detail.

Proficient with Microsoft Office Suite. Be able to sit and use a microscope for long periods in a laboratory setting. Be able to accurately interpret and follow established protocols, guidelines, and procedures. You must be comfortable with, and able to work in an aquatic environment. Work effectively in inclement weather, including hot, cold, rain and fog conditions. Be able to lift 40 pounds.

To apply for this external internship, you must be a current undergraduate student in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology Department at UC Davis and in good standing. If you are interested, please contact the Cramer Fish Sciences Hiring Group HR@fishsciences.net, and include a cover letter and recent resume.  Successful applicants will be  encouraged to apply for a Lloyd W. Swift award by completing this google form to support their internship.

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Cramer Fish Sciences (CFS) is accepting applications for Internships based out of their West Sacramento office.  Summer Quarter Internship Opportunity. Apply by April 1st 2022.

As a CFS Intern you will receive hands-on experience in a range of laboratory, office and field settings and see how applied science can support environmental management. Specifically, you will be responsible for performing literature reviews and updating a length-weight relationship for common freshwater macroinvertebrates found in the California Central Valley. Macroinvertbrate biomasses play a key role in understanding food webs, bioenergetics, and the assessing the effectiveness of river restoration. The internship is lab and office focused, with possible field work opportunities on various CFS studies. A minimum of one full 8-hour day or two 4-hour days per week is required.

Essential duties and responsibilities: 
1.Safely conduct supervised field and lab work for a wide array of projects.
2. Careful lab work performance with diligence for organization and attention to detail.
3. Perform hands-on work in a field setting which may include fish trapping and tagging, visual   estimation techniques (e.g., snorkeling, redd surveys), collecting physical environmental data (e.g., water quality, channel bathymetry), and attention to detail.

Proficient with Microsoft Office Suite. Be able to sit and use a microscope for long periods in a laboratory setting. Be able to accurately interpret and follow established protocols, guidelines, and procedures. You must be comfortable with, and able to work in an aquatic environment. Work effectively in inclement weather, including hot, cold, rain and fog conditions. Be able to lift 40 pounds.

To apply for this external internship, you must be a current undergraduate student in the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology Department at UC Davis and in good standing. If you are interested, please contact the Cramer Fish Sciences Hiring Group HR@fishsciences.net, and include a cover letter and recent resume.  Successful applicants will be  encouraged to apply for a Lloyd W. Swift award by completing this google form to support their internship.

Summer Research Opportunities: 

The Smith Ecology LabThe Smith Ecology Lab page is a great undergraduate research and internship resource.

 

birdsnest.jpgInternship opportunities with the Karp Lab. We are seeking applications for field technicians to monitor bird nest boxes in Yolo County from late March to early August. Techs will assist graduate student Katie Lauck with handling and banding nestlings to collect growth measurements and blood/fecal samples. This research is part of a broader study on the impacts of temperature spikes and climate change on bird nesting success, and techs will be given opportunities to earn authorship on resulting manuscripts.

If interested, contact Daniel Karp (dkarp@ucdavis.edu)  and Katherine Lauck (kslauck@ucdavis.edu) to collaboratively develop a Swift application. Please include in the email (1) a short cover letter stating why you are interested in the position and any relevant experience and (2) your CV or resume. More information about the Karp Lab: https://karp.ucdavis.edu/

intern4.jpgInternship opportunities in the Otolith Geochemistry and Fish Ecology Laboratory for Spring-Summer 2022. Our lab focuses on fish ecology and conservation, including patterns in the distribution, growth rates, otolith (ear stone) chemistry, and migration of native fishes. Work is conducted in the W.E.T. facility or Center for Aquatic Biology and Aquaculture (CABA). Examples of potential internship projects include:

  • comparison of the age structure, growth, and migration of Northern Anchovy morphotoypes (coastal, bay)
  • genetic, otolith, and chemical identification of the origins of Least Tern prey, including salmon and native osmerid smelts
  • examination of the domestication index of endangered cultured Delta Smelt and its relation to the formation of abnormal (vateritic) otolith development.

If interested, contact Dr. Levi S. Lewis lslewis@ucdavis.edu Photo credit: Longfin Smelt juvenile, showing the otoliths (ear stones) in the cranial cavity (by Levi Lewis).

Lloyd Swift Summer Intern opportunities in the Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology (MWFB). Please contact Project PI – Andy Engilis, aengilisjr@ucdavis.edu Curator MWFB if you are interested in any of the MWFB announcements. First and second year WFCB students are encouraged to apply.

The Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology has two important curation projects slated for the Summer of 2022. Through these projects you will learn skills including taxonomy, databasing, organization, curation and care of specimens. The two projects will start July 1 and run through the end of September. The students will be supervised by Collections Manager Irene Engilis and Museum Specialist Rachel Alsheikh. The two project specific areas include:  

  • Curation of California Mammals Acquisitions, (two positions). Two students will work on recent mammal acquisitions to help catalog and install incoming mammal specimens. Students will be trained in basic mammal taxonomy and organization, truth metadata, cataloging, database entry and specimen care.
  • Curation of the San Jose State Fish Collection, (one position). One student will work in the Fish Collection to help integrate the San Jose State Fish Collection with the MWFB collection. The student will be trained in basic fish taxonomy and organization, truth metadata, cataloging, database entry and specimen care.