Courses

Lower Division Courses

10. Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (4)
Offered every Fall and Spring quarter. Kelt, Fangue
Lecture--3 hours; discussion--1 hour. Introduction to the ecology and conservation of vertebrates. Complexity and severity of world problems in conserving biological diversity. GE credit: SciEng, Div, Wrt | SE, SL, WE.

50. Natural History of California’s Wild Vertebrates (3)
Offered every Winter quarter. The Staff
Lecture--2hrs; discussion--1 hr. Examination of the natural history of California's wild vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals), including their biogeography, systematics, ecology and conservation status. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, SL, WE.

51*. Introduction to Conservation Biology (3)
Offerings vary. Caro
Lecture—3.0 hrs/wk. Introduction to conservation biology including both biological and social issues related to the loss of species and habitats. Intended for students with no background in biological sciences. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, SL.

92. Internship (1-6)
I, II, III. The Staff (Department Chairperson in charge)
Internship--3-18 hours. Prerequisite:lower division standing and consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in the department. Internships supervised by a member of the faculty. (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division Courses

100. Field Methods in Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology (4)
Offered every Spring quarter. Eadie, Kelt, Todd, Van Vuren
Lecture 10 hours total; laboratory 30 hours total; fieldwork 30 hours total. Prerequisite: Environmental Science and Policy 100 or Evolution and Ecology 101 or the equivalent, additional coursework on systematics of groups of organisms desirable, and consent of instructor. Introduction to field methods for research on the ecology and conservation of vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants, and to the scientific method, experimental design, and data preparation. Required weekend fieldtrip.

101. Field Research in Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology (2)
Offered Fall quarter in even numbered years. Eadie, Kelt, Todd, Van Vuren
Lecture/Discussion--2 hours. Prerequisite:Consent of instructor and one upper division course in each of ecology, statistics, and ornithology, mammalogy, or herpetology. Field research in ecology of wild vertebrates in terrestrial environments; formulation of testable hypotheses, study design, introduction to research methodology, oral and written presentation of results. Limited enrollment. GE Credit: Wrt.

101L. Field Research in Wildlife Ecology: Laboratory (4)
Offered Fall quarter in even numbered years. Eadie, Kelt, Todd, Van Vuren
Lecture/Discussion--2 hours, fieldwork--15 hours. Prerequisite:Consent of instructor, course 101 (may be taken concurrently), and one upper division course in each of ecology, statistics, and ornithology, mammalogy, or herpetology. Field research in ecology of wild vertebrates in terrestrial environments; testing ecological hypotheses through field research, application of research methodology, supervised independent research projects. Held between Labor Day and Fall quarter. Limited enrollment.

102*. Field Studies in Fish Biology (1)
Offerings vary. 
Lecture/discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite:upper division course in each of ecology, aquatic biology, fish biology, and statistics, and consent of instructor. Emphasis on theory of quantitative fish capture methods and design of individual research projects on ecology, behavior, physiology or population biology of fishes.

102L*. Field Studies in Fish Biology: Laboratory (6)
Offerings vary. 
Fieldwork--15 hours; laboratory--12 hours; discussion/laboratory--3 hours. Prerequisite:course 102, upper division course in each of ecology, aquatic biology, fish biology, and statistics, and consent of instructor. Field investigations of fish biology are emphasized including quantitative capture methods and individual research projects on ecology, behavior, physiology or population biology of fishes at the field site in relation to their habitats. (Deferred grading pending completion of projects.) GE Credit: SciEng, Wrt.

103. Applied Statistics for Wildlife Research (4)
Offered every Winter quarter. Sollmann
Lecture—3 hour(s); Laboratory—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): (MAT 016B or MAT 017B or MAT 021B); (WFC 010 or WFC 050); or Consent of Instructor. Introduction to basic statistical concepts and methods as tools for fish and wildlife research. Application of general guiding principles of developing research questions and projects, basic probability theory, statistical estimation (correlation, regression, ANOVA, Chi-square test) and hypothesis testing. Introduction of some specialized analytical techniques, such as population dynamics modeling and time series analysis. Only two units credit allowed to students who have completed courses STA 013, STA 100, or PLS 120.

110. Biology and Conservation of Wild Mammals (3)
Offered every Spring quarter. Kelt
Lecture--3 hours. Prerequisite: (BIS 002A, BIS 002B, BIS 002C); (EVE 101 (can be concurrent) or ESP 100 (can be concurrent)); Or equivalent course to ESP 100 or EVE 101. Biology and conservation of wild mammals. Natural history, taxonomy, geographical-ecological distribution; anatomical-physiological-behavioral adaptations of mammals to their environment; and research/management techniques are emphasized.

110L. Laboratory in Biology and Conservation of Wild Mammals (3)
Offered every Spring quarter. Kelt
Laboratory--6 hours. Prerequisite: WFC 110 (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Laboratory exercises in the morphology, systematics, species identification, anatomy, and adaptations of wild mammals to different habitats. Limited enrollment.

111. Biology and Conservation of Wild Birds (3)
Offered every Fall quarter. Eadie
Lecture--3 hours. Prerequisite: BIS 002A; BIS 002B; BIS 002C; Upper division ecology course recommended. Phylogeny, distribution, migration, reproduction, population dynamics, behavior and physiological ecology of wild birds. Emphasis on adaptations to environments, species interactions, management, and conservation.

111L. Laboratory in Biology and Conservation of Wild Birds (3)
Offered every Fall quarter. Eadie
Laboratory--6 hours. Prerequisite: WFC 111 (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Laboratory exercises in bird species identification, anatomy, molts, age and sex, specialized adaptations, behavior research, with emphasis on conservation of wild birds. Limited enrollment.

120. Biology and Conservation of Fishes (3)
Offered every Fall quarter. Rypel
Lecture--3 hours. Prerequisite: BIS 002A; BIS 002B; BIS 002C; Upper division ecology course recommended. Introduction to evolution, ecology, and conservation of marine and freshwater fishes.

120L. Laboratory in Biology and Conservation of Fishes (2)
Offered every Fall quarter. Rypel
Laboratory--3 hours. Prerequisite: WFC 120 (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Morphology, taxonomy, conservation, and identification of marine and freshwater fishes with emphasis on California species. Limited enrollment.

121*. Physiology of Fishes (4)
Offerings vary.
Lecture--3 hours; laboratory--3 hours. Prerequisite:upper division courses in nutrition and physiology or consent of instructor. Comparative physiology, growth, reproduction, behavior, and energy relations of fishes. GE Credit: SciEng, Wrt.

122*. Population Dynamics and Estimation (4)
Offerings vary. Botsford
Lecture--3 hours; laboratory--3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16A-16B; Statistics 13 or the equivalent; an upper division course in ecology. Description of bird, mammal and fish population dynamics, modeling philosophy, techniques for estimation of animal abundance (e.g., mark-recapture, change-in-ratio, etc.), mathematical models of populations (e.g., Leslie matrix, logistic, dynamic pool, stock-recruitment); case histories.

124. Sampling Animal Populations (4)
Offered every Spring quarter. Sollmann
Lecture--3 hours; Laboratory--3 hours.  Prerequisite: (STA 100 or PLS 120); (EVE 101 or ESP 100); or equivalent; upper division standing. Introduction to major statistical modeling approaches for estimating animal population parameters, including: sample counts, distance sampling, repeated point counts (N-mixture modeling), capture-mark-recapture for closed and open populations, static and dynamic occupancy modeling, and richness estimation. Methods are embedded in the context of obtaining reliable estimates of abundance, survival, occurrence and other ecological parameters for management and conservation.

125. Tropical Ecology and Conservation (4)
Offered Fall quarter in even numbered years. Karp
Lecture--3 hours; discussion--1 hour.  Prerequisite(s): EVE 101 or ESP 100. Ecology and natural history of the tropics. Challenges and opportunities associated with tropical conservation. Design and communicate course-based research project. Only 2 units credit allowed to students who have completed EVE 138.

130. Physiological Ecology of Wildlife (4)
Offered every Winter quarter. Fangue
Lecture--3 hours; discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite: EVE 101 or ESP 100; (BIS 002A, BIS 002B, BIS 002C); Or equivalent course to ESP 100. Animal functions, adaptations, and ecological energetics of wildlife. Nutrition, metabolism, and productivity are emphasized as a pattern of relationships for understanding the distribution and abundance of wild ectotherms and endotherms in time and space.

134. Herpetology (3)
Offered every Winter quarter. Todd
Lecture—2 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: BIS 002A; BIS 002B; BIS 002C; Upper division ecology course recommended. Evolution and ecology of the world’s diverse reptiles and amphibians. Emphasis on adaptations to environments, species interactions, management, and conservation.

134L. Herpetology Laboratory (3)
Offered every Winter quarter. Todd
Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: WFC 134 (can be concurrent); and Consent of Instructor. Diagnostic characteristics and functional attributes of amphibians and reptiles, emphasizing ecological, bio-geographic and phylogenetic patterns. Field experience with common species of reptiles and amphibians in the Davis area.

136. Ecology of Waterfowl and Game Birds (3)
Offered Winter quarter in even numbered years. Eadie
Lecture--2 hours; laboratory--3 hours; field trip. Prerequisite:courses 111 and 111L or the equivalent. Detailed examination of distribution, behavior, population dynamics, and management of waterfowl and upland game birds.

141*. Behavioral Ecology (4)
Offerings vary.
Lecture--3 hours; Film Viewing—1 hour. Prerequisite: EVE 101 or ESP 100 (can be concurrent); (BIS 002A, BIS 002B, BIS 002C); Or equivalent course. Basic theories underlying the functional and evolutionary significance of behavior, and the role of ecological constraints. Supporting empirical evidence taken mainly from studies of wild vertebrates.

144*. Marine Conservation Science (4)
Offerings vary.
Lecture—3 hours; Discussion—1 hours. Prerequisites: Course in introductory ecology. Limited to 30 students. Key differences between marine and terrestrial ecosystems, major stressors of marine ecosystems (e.g., fisheries, pollution, bioinvasions, climate change and habitat destruction) and their consequences. Laws and agencies responsible for addressing problems, and the policies used.

151. Wildlife Ecology (4)
Offered every Fall quarter. Van Vuren
Lecture--3 hours, discussion--1. Prerequisite: BIS 002B; Or equivalent. Ecology of wild vertebrates, including habitat selection, spatial organization, demography, population growth and regulation, competition, predation, and community dynamics, set in the context of human-caused degradation of environments in North America.

152. Ecology of Human-Wildlife Conflict (3)
Offered Winter quarter in odd numbered years. Van Vuren
Lecture--3 hours. Prerequisite: BIS 002B; Or equivalent. Ecological approaches to managing wild vertebrates that cause problems for agriculture, public health, or conservation of biodiversity.

153*. Wildlife Ecotoxicology (4)
Offerings vary.
Lecture--3 hours; discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite:introductory courses in organic chemistry, ecology, and physiology, or consent of instructor; Environmental Toxicology 101 recommended. Various forms of environmental pollution in relation to fish and wildlife, the effects and mechanisms of pollutants, effects on individuals and systems, laboratory and field ecotoxicology, examples/case histories, philosophical/management considerations. GE Credit: SciEng, Wrt.

154. Conservation Biology (4)
Offered every Winter quarter. Karp
Lecture--3 hours. Prerequisite: BIS 002B; Or equivalent. Introduction to conservation biology. Background to the biological issues and controversies surrounding loss of species and habitats.

155*. Habitat Conservation and Restoration (3)
Offerings vary.
Lecture—3 hour(s). Prerequisites: EVE 101 or ESP 100; Or the equivalent of ESP 100 or EVE 101; WFC 154 and ENH 160 recommended. Analysis of the characteristics of wildlife and fish habitats, the conservation of habitats, and restoration. GE credit: SE, VL, WE.

155L*. Habitat Conservation and Restoration Laboratory (2)
Offerings vary.
Fieldwork—3 hour(s); Laboratory—3 hour(s). Prerequisites: (EVE 101 or ESP 100); WFC 155 (can be concurrent); Or the equivalent of ESP 100 or EVE 101. Analysis of the characteristics of wildlife and fish habitats, application of restoration methods, and evaluation of conservation and restoration projects in the field. Participate during the term in a restoration project.

156*. Plant Geography (4)
Offerings vary.
Lecture-3 hours; Lab/Fieldwork-3 hours; Term Paper. Prerequisite:EST 100 or EVE 101 required; upper division courses in plant taxonomy recommended. Survey of the geographical distribution of vegetation types and habitats, with consideration of the environmental and historical factors that determine these patterns. Conservation and management approaches will be discussed. Analytical field and lab techniques will be introduced. GE Credit: SciEng, Wrt.

157*. Coastal Ecosystems (4)
Offerings vary.
Lecture-3 hours; Lab/Fieldwork-3 hours. Prerequisite: ESP 100 or EVE 101 required; coursework in organismal biology, physical geography, and geology useful. Overview of coastal ecosystems, physical and biological elements and processes, and coastal zone dynamics, including sandy, rocky and muddy shorelines, estuaries, dunes, and coastal watersheds. Discussion of the role of historical factors and conservation, restoration, and management approaches.

158*. Infectious disease in ecology and conservation (3)
Offerings vary.
Lecture--3.0 hrs/wk. Introduction to the dynamics and control of infectious disease in wildlife, including zoonotic diseases and those threatening endangered species. Basic epidemiological models and their applications. Role of scientists in developing disease control policies.

160*. Animal Coloration (3)
Offerings vary
Lecture/Discussion--3.0 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 2A, 2B, 2C. Evolutionary and ecological significance of coloration in mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, cephalopods, crustaceans, spiders, insects, humans as well as color in fashion, plants and the military. Topics include history, protective coloration, warning coloration, mimicry, sexual dichromatism and color change. 

168. Climate Change Ecology (4)
Offered every Winter quarter. Post
Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): BIS 002B; (EVE 101 or ESP 100); or Consent of Instructor. Ecological responses to current and expected future climate change, across levels of biological organization from individuals to ecosystems.

190. Proseminar in Wildlife and Fisheries Biology (1)
I, II, III. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
Seminar--1 hour. Prerequisite:upper division standing in biological sciences or consent of instructor. Reports and discussions of recent advances related to wildlife and fisheries biology. May be repeated twice for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

190C. Research Group Conference (1)
I, II, III. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
Discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite:advanced standing; consent of instructor. Weekly conference on research problems, progress and techniques in wildlife and fisheries biology. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

192. Internship (1-12)
I, II, III, summer. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
Internship--3-36 hours. Prerequisite:completion of 84 units and consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in the department. Internships supervised by a member of the faculty. (P/NP grading only.)

195. Field and Laboratory Research (3)
I, II, III. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
Laboratory--6 hours; discussion--1 hour. Prerequisite:course 110L, 111L, or 120L; 121 or 130; Evolution and Ecology 101 or the equivalent; and consent of instructor. Critique and practice of research methods applied to field and/or laboratory environments of wild vertebrates. Students work independently or in small groups to design experimental protocol, analyze data, and report their findings. May be repeated twice for credit.

197T. Tutoring in Wildlife and Fisheries (1-5)
I, II, III. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
Prerequisite:major in Wildlife and Fisheries Biology and consent of instructor. Experience in teaching under guidance of faculty member. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)
I, II, III. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)
I, II, III. The Staff (Chairperson in charge)
(P/NP grading only.)

Graduate Courses

222*. Advanced Population Dynamics (3)
Offerings vary. Botsford. 
Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; advanced course in ecology (e.g., Evolution and Ecology 101), population dynamics (e.g., course 122), and one year of calculus; familiarity with matrix algebra and partial differential equations recommended. Logical basis for population models, evaluation of simple ecological models, current population models with age, size, and stage structure, theoretical basis for management and exemplary case histories. Emphasis on development and use of realistic population models in ecological research. 

223*. Conservation Biology and Animal Behavior (3)
Offerings vary. Caro
Lecture—1.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: Ecology 208 or Animal Behavior 221. Influences of concepts of animal behavior (functional, evolutionary, developmental, mechanistic, and methodological issues) on conservation biology theory and practice.

290. Seminar (1-3)
I, II, III. The Staff
Seminar—1-3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar devoted to a highly specific research topic in any area of wildlife or fisheries biology. Special topic selected for a quarter will vary depending on interests of instructor and students. (S/U grading only.)

290C. Research Group Conference (1)
I, II, III. The Staff
Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Weekly conference on research problems, progress and techniques in wildlife and fishery sciences. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)

291. Seminar in Aquatic Ecology
Offerings vary. Moyle
Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in biology. Presentation and analysis of assigned topics in aquatic ecology emphasizing fish, fisheries and aquatic conservation. Offered in alternate years. (S/U grading only.)

292. Physiology of Fishes Seminar (1)
Offerings vary.
Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing and at least two courses in physiology; consent of instructor. Seminar devoted to current topics concerning the physiological functioning of fishes. May be repeated two times for credit. Offered irregularly. (S/U grading only.)

294*. Behavioral Ecology of Predators and Prey (3)
Offerings vary. Caro
Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Presentation and analysis of research papers on social and foraging behavior of predatory animals, antipredator strategies of prey species, co-evolution of predators and prey, and ecology of predator prey interactions. May be repeated two times for credit. (Same course as Animal Behavior 294.) 

295. Seminar in Wildlife Ecotoxicology (3)
Offerings vary.
Seminar—2 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in biology. Presentation and analysis of assigned and searched research papers on transport, exposure, and effects of environmental contaminants on wildlife-associated ecosystem components, especially at individual/population levels. Specific subjects vary each offering. Offered irregularly. (S/U grading only.)

297T. Supervised Teaching in Wildlife and Fisheries Biology (1–3)
I, II, III. The Staff
Tutorial—3–9 hours. Prerequisite: meet qualifications for teaching assistant; graduate standing; and consent of instructor. Tutoring and teaching students in undergraduate courses in Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology. Weekly conferences with instructor; evaluations of teaching; preparing for and conducting demonstrations, laboratories, and discussions; preparing and grading examinations. May be repeated for a total of 6 units when a different course is tutored. (S/U grading only.)

298. Group Study (1-5)

299. Research (1-12)
I, II, III. The Staff
(S/U grading only.)